Operators

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Equal (=) Function

The equal operator is used to assign a value to a variable or vector, or to compare values. 

When used for assignment, a single variable or vector on the left side of the = operator is given the value determined by one or more variables, vectors, and/or expressions on the right side. Also, the SET keyword must precede the variable name when the = operator is used for an assignment: 

SET A = 123 
SET B = 123 
A = B = TRUE

Greater Than (>) Function

The > operator determines if the first expression is greater-than the second expression. 

Example: 

SET A = 124 
SET B = 123 
A > B = TRUE

Less Than (<) Function

The < operator determines if the first expression is less-than the second expression. 

Example: 

SET A = 123 
SET B = 124 
A > B = TRUE

Greater Than or Equal To (>=) Function

The >= operator determines if the first expression is greater-than or equal to the second expression. 

Example: 

SET A = 123 
SET B = 123 
A >= B = TRUE 

And: 

SET A = 124 
SET B = 123 
A >= B = TRUE

Less Than or Equal To (<=) Function

The <= operator determines if the first expression is less-than or equal to the second expression. 

Example: 

SET A = 123 
SET B = 123 
A <= B = TRUE
 

And: 

SET A = 123 
SET B = 124 
A <= B = TRUE

Not Equal (<> or !=) Function

Both the != and the <> inequality operators determine if the first expression is not equal to the second expression. 

Example: 

SET A = 123 
SET B = 124 
A != B = TRUE

AND Function

The AND operator is used to perform a logical conjunction on two expressions, where the expressions are Null, or are of Boolean subtype and have a value of True or False. 

The AND operator can also be used a “bitwise operator” to make a bit-by-bit comparison of two integers. If both bits in the comparison are 1, then a 1 is returned. Otherwise, a 0 is returned. 

When using the AND to compare Boolean expressions, the order of the expressions is not important. 

Example: 

(TRUE = TRUE AND FALSE = FALSE) = TRUE 

And: 

(TRUE = TRUE AND FALSE = TRUE) = FALSE

OR Function

The OR operator is used to perform a logical disjunction on two expressions, where the expressions are Null, or are of Boolean subtype and have a value of True or False. 

The OR operator can also be used a “bitwise operator” to make a bit-by-bit comparison of two integers. If one or both bits in the comparison are 1, then a 1 is returned. Otherwise, a 0 is returned. 

When using the OR to compare Boolean expressions, the order of the expressions is important. 

Example: 

(TRUE = TRUE OR TRUE = FALSE) = TRUE 

And: 

(FALSE = TRUE OR TRUE = FALSE) = FALSE

XOR Function

The XOR operator is used to perform a logical exclusion on two expressions, where the expressions are Null, or are of Boolean subtype and have a value of True or False. 

The XOR operator can also be used a “bitwise operator” to make a bit-by-bit comparison of two integers. If both bits are the same in the comparison (both are 0’s or 1’s), then a 0 is returned. Otherwise, a 1 is returned. 

Example: 

(TRUE XOR FALSE) = TRUE 

And: 

(FALSE XOR FALSE) = FALSE

NOT Function

The NOT operator is used to perform a logical negation on an expression. The expression must be of Boolean subtype and have a value of True or False. This operator causes a True expression to become False, and a False expression to become True. 

Example: 

NOT (TRUE = FALSE) = TRUE 

And: 

NOT (TRUE = TRUE) = FALSE

EQV Function

The EQV operator is used to perform a logical comparison on two expressions (i.e., are the two expressions identical), where the expressions are Null, or are of Boolean subtype and have a value of True or False. 

The EQV operator can also be used a “bitwise operator” to make a bit-by-bit comparison of two integers. If both bits in the comparison are the same (both are 0’s or 1’s), then a 1 is returned. Otherwise, a 0 is returned. 

The order of the expressions in the comparison is not important.

Example: 

TRUE EQV TRUE = TRUE 

And: 

TRUE EQV FALSE = FALSE

MOD Function

The MOD operator divides two numbers and returns the remainder. In the example below, 5 divides into 21, 4 times with a remainder of 1. 

Example: 

21 MOD 5 = 1 

And: 

22 MOD 5 = 2

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